Tuesday, October 20, 2009

JUGGLERS AT THE BORDER

JUGGLERS AT THE BORDER

ROBERT FATE’S LATEST HARDBOILDED BABY SHARK TALE, JUGGLERS AT THE BORDER, HAS JUST HIT BOOKSTORES AND AMAZON. I’VE REALLY ENJOY THE FIRST THREE ENTRIES IN THIS FAST MOVING, TOUGH AS NAILS, POOL CUES, BIKER BOOTS, AND SWITCHBLADE TALES, AND WILL PUT MY COPY OF THIS LATEST TALE AT THE TOP OF MY TO BE READ PILE.

EARLY REVIEWS HAVE BEEN POSITIVE:


PUBLISHERS WEEKLY - STARRED REVIEW

At the start of Fate's masterful fourth 1950s PI novel (after 2008's Baby Shark's High Plains Redemption), Kristin Van Dijk, who's been tied up in a farmhouse by two silver thieves she was tracking, manages to free herself and take out a killer, later identified as a sociopathic felon, who a little earlier showed up and gunned down the two thieves, unaware of her presence.

Meanwhile, word reaches Kristin's partner, Otis Millett, that his ex-wife, Dixie Logan, a former stripper known as the Dallas Firecracker, has been murdered. Dixie's last job was at a bank in Mesquite, Texas that had been held up a few weeks before and her body was found with that of a man who may have been one of the robbers.

Kristin, a hard-as-nails heroine who's completely credible, and Otis dedicate themselves to solving Dixie's murder and sorting out whether she colluded in the bank theft. The pages will speed by for readers who enjoy gritty crime tales with plenty of flying bullets.

BOOKLIST – STARRED REVIEW

With her pool-hustling career gathering dust like the parched Texas border towns where she was raised, Baby Shark, aka Kristin Van Dijk, is now a full-time private eye. The year is 1958, and the case is personal.

The estranged, ex-stripper wife of Baby Shark's partner, Otis Millett, has been murdered. But her’s will not be the only bullet-riddled corpse to dot these pages. The violence seems to be centered on a series of successful big money bank robberies and a lunatic mastermind with little interest in splitting the take.

Cutting a deal with Fort Worth police detective Carl Lynch, Baby Shark and Otis talk their way into participating in the investigation — as bait. But Baby Shark Van Dijk is bait that bites back, while Otis covers her play with guns blazing.

Fate fills his novels with verisimilitude; we smell the unfiltered smokes while jukeboxes play old songs that somehow feel brand new. With book four in this gritty series (following Baby Shark’s High Plains Redemption, 2008), Fate again jacks pulp fiction up a notch or three beyond the old Black Mask formulas. Hard-boiled just doesn’t get much better than Baby Shark spinning another .38-caliber tale.

Capital Crime Press
Trade Paper, $14.95

1 comment:

Sheila Lowe said...

This is a great series. I love the interaction between Kristin and Otis, and I'm always lobbying to get Henry Chin more space. Fate really brings these characters to life, and transports us to another time when there were no cell phones, HDTV or WII.