Wednesday, May 26, 2010

tHE HUNGER GAMES GIVE-AWAY!

THE HUNGER GAMES GIVE-AWAY!

I’ve been reading a lot of Y/A fiction recently and catching up with some titles that have taken a while to get to the top of my to be read file.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins absolutly lives up to all the hype and critical attention it has received since it’s publication in 2008. For years now, I’ve maintained a lot of the most literate, honest, and involving writing is being ignored because it is labled as young adult (Y/A) fiction. This is changing, but only slowly. Given the chance to be shipwrecked with the Y/A section of a bookstore or the Fiction section, I’d take the Y/A section in a heartbeat.

Dystopian societies are a popular theme in Y/A fiction, but it is rarely done with the complete world-building skill Collins brings to The Hunger games.

THE HUNGER GAMES

In a not-too-distant future, the United States of America has collapsed, weakened by drought, fire, famine, and war, to be replaced by Panem, a country divided into the Capitol and 12 districts. Each year, two young representatives from each district are selected by lottery to participate in The Hunger Games. Part entertainment, part brutal intimidation of the subjugated districts, the televised games are broadcasted throughout Panem as the 24 participants are forced to eliminate their competitors, literally, with all citizens required to watch.

When 16-year-old Katniss’ young sister, Prim, is selected as the mining district’s female representative, Katniss volunteers to take her place. She and her male counterpart, Peeta, the son of the town baker who seems to have all the fighting skills of a lump of bread dough, will be pitted against bigger, stronger representatives who have trained for this their whole lives. Collins’ characters are completely realistic and sympathetic as they form alliances and friendships in the face of overwhelming odds; the plot is tense, dramatic, and engrossing.

PER WIKIPEDIA:


Collins states the idea for The Hunger Games came to her one day when she was channel-surfing, and the lines between a reality show competition and war coverage "began to blur in this very unsettling way." She also cites the Greek myth of Theseus, in which the city of Athens was forced to send young men and women to Crete to be devoured by the Minotaur, as inspiration for the nation of Panem; she explains, "Crete was sending a very clear message: 'Mess with us and we'll do something worse than kill you. We'll kill your children.'"

I have one copy of The Hunger Games to give away. To enter add a comment to this post telling me you’re in it to win it before June 1st, when I’ll pick a winner at random.

3 comments:

Jesse said...

I think you're going to have to bar me from entering these giveaways.

Matthew P. Mayo said...

I'm in it to win! (Did that sound convincing enough?)

Cheers,
Matt

bish8 said...

JESSE ~ J KNEW I COULD RELY ON YOU!

MATHEW ~ CONVINCING ENOUGH FOR ME . . .