Thursday, June 30, 2011

FORGOTTEN BOOKS: TELLING LIES FOR FUN AND PROFIT!

FORGOTTEN BOOKS: TELLING LIES FOR FUN AND PROFIT!

LAWRENCE BLOCK

I’ve read a lot of writing books over the years. Most of them have provided at least a little inspiration in that reading about writing reminds me I am a writer and can motivate me to get back to putting words on paper.

However, the one book I’ve found to actually help me be a better writer is Lawrence Block’s Telling Lies For Fun And Profit. This collection of Block’s cherished Writer’s Digest columns is filled with Block’s brand of gentle wisdom, wry observations, dry humor, and positive affirmations for writers of all experience.

TELLING LIES FOR FUN AND PROFIT

Characters refusing to talk? Plot plodding along? Where do good ideas come from anyway? In this wonderfully practical volume, two-time Edgar Award-winning novelist Lawrence Block takes an inside look at writing as a craft and as a career.

From studying the market, to mastering self-discipline and "creative procrastination," through coping with rejections, Telling Lies for Fun And Profit is an invaluable sourcebook of information. It is a must read for anyone serious about writing or understanding how the process works.

If you only ever read one book about writing, or if you haven’t read one in a while and are looking for something to get you excited about the writing experience again, you can’t do better than this addictive read.

With the advent of e-books, Telling Lies For Fun And Profit is easily available. Get it now!

2 comments:

Brian Drake said...

I couldn't agree more with the value of this book. I read it often, even for entertainment when I don't want to read something else. It's terrific.

Todd Mason said...

It's great when a genuinely brilliant writer can also articulate, particularly at the nuts and bolts level, how to help yourself out and what to actually do getting started. Damon Knight (CREATING SHORT FICTION), Kate Wilhem (STORYTELLER), and Algis Budrys (WRITING TO THE POINT) all took, among other things, what teaching at Clarion crystallized for them and put it in print, similarly.