Wednesday, December 19, 2012

PULP NOW: THE COMPLETE ADVENTURES OF THIBAUT CORDAY!

PULP NOW: THE COMPLETE ADVENTURES OF THIBAUT CORDAY!
 
THEODORE ROSCOE
 
FOUR VOLUMES PUBLISHED BY ALTUS PRESS
 
I read a lot of pulp stories and am always delighted to see publishers such as Altus Press and Black Dog Books reprinting affordable, beautifully produced, collections from pulp masters.  In particular this year, Altus Press has given us four volumes in The Complete Adventures Of Thibaut Corday And The Foreign Legion – featuring all twenty stories  originally appearing in issues of Argosy Magazine between 1929 and 1939.
 
The fourth and final volume, The Heads Of Sergeant Baptiste, has just hit the bookshelves and contains my favorite Foreign Legion story, The Wonderful Lamp of Thibaut Corday – the best retelling of the story of Aladdin’s lamp I have ever come across.
 
Theodore Roscoe, the creator of the old Legionnaire Thibaut Corday, was a master pulp writer on par with my other favorite adventure pulp wordsmiths, H. Beresford Jones and Talbot Mundy.  Roscoe had the ability to make the reader feel every grain of desert sand and every ray of scorching sun.  Flowing from Roscoe’s pen, the Foreign Legion was never more romantic or glorified.
 
Each volume in this series is full of storytelling gems as the old Legionnaire himself, Thibaut Corday weaves his spellbinding art in small cafes over horded drinks and one-up-manship.  But the true heart of these stories has the reader waiting breathlessly for Corday to explain how the fantastic happenings he has just described have a possible common and plausible explanation – pure storytelling genius.
 
The Complete Adventures Of Thibaut Corday And The Foreign Legion ( Volume 1: Better Than Bullets, Volume 2: Toughest In The Legion, Volume 3: The Kid And The Cutthroats, and Volume 4: The Heads Of Sergeant Baptiste) are a must for every pulp fan who thrives on armchair adventure from a day when the world still held mysteries and all things were possible.  Pick any volume and lose yourself in some of the best pulp writing ever ...
 

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